Less Invasive UK Plastic Surgery Ends In 26000 Pound Award


A BUSINESSMAN who feared ending up looking like Michael Jackson if he had cosmetic surgery on his nose has won £26,000 after an operation left him with lifelong scars. Rugby playing entrepreneur, Carl Egonu, 49, became “depressed and withdrawn” after part of his nose was left “raised and shiny”, and darker than surrounding skin, following the private operation at the Plymouth Nuffield Hospital in March 2006. The “dermabrasion” operation left a patch of “dark smooth scar” on the top of his nose, which Judge Christopher Gardner QC described as “a significant cosmetic defect which he will have to bear for the rest of his life”.

Source: thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4644309/Mans-plastic-surgery-
left-his-nose-a-different-colour.html

Trends affect the plastic surgery marketplace as they do in other fields. “Non invasive” has been a key term for plastic surgery for many years now. The public in under the impression that less invasive is better with lesser risk. This is not always the case.

Carl Egonu, a British Rugby player with a damaged nose, went looking for a rhinoplasty. He ultimately had dermabrasion instead and by the looks of things he suffered skin loss. The pictures tell all. He is left with a noticeable discolored scar which is probably not what he had in mind when he signed up.

Dermabrasion is a “sanding” procedure of sorts. Why a man with pigmented skin and a broad previously damaged nose was offered dermabrasion is beyond me. Darker skinned people have more risk of hyperpigmentation even if the operation works as planed. In my opinion the operative selection had little potential to improve Mr Egonu’s appearance. The risk/benefit ratio here was not great. The news piece indicates the patient chose this. He shouldn’t have been offered it in the first place.

In this case less invasive bagged him 26000 pounds from the lawsuit, but also an appearance he will need to hide for the rest of his life.

Best Regards,

John Di Saia MD

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